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James and Amy with their upcycled wool bedspread

A Special Wedding Present from Recycled Woollens

narrowboat

James and Amy’s narrowboat, Willow

James and Amy live aboard this beautiful narrow boat, which is called Willow. When they announced they were getting married, James’ mum, Pat, got in touch to see if I would make them a bespoke bedspread for a wedding present. It was to be a gift from Pat and her friend, Alison. They thought that the upcycled nature of my work, using recycled wool knitwear would appeal to James and Amy. I love making bedspreads, and I love even more when it is for a special occasion like this. I do love a good wedding!

Recycled knitwear destined to be upcycled into a bedspread

Recycled knitwear destined to be upcycled into a bedspread

So the first task was to collect enough recycled wool jumpers in the burgundy, cream and green shades that Pat had requested. All jumpers are washed first before dissected.  Once the seams, cuffs and collars have been cut off, the woollen pieces are cut into rectangles. Pat had requested that the middle square be left blank for something special they wanted to add.

Rail fence design patchwork bedspread

Rail fence design patchwork bedspread

Once the rectangles are all cut, they are places in groups of 3 and sewn together to form squares. The squares are then sewn up in strips. I use an industrial overlocker for this, and I like to have my seams on the outside. I used burgundy thread, to compliment the colours chosen.

The middle square was plain cream, which was waiting for Alison’s handiwork.

Insert for bedspread showing the happy couple's initials

Insert for bedspread showing the happy couple’s initials

It is tradition amongst the barge community, that when living on ‘the cut’ a boy would ask a girl to marry him by writing his initials above his girlfriends in grease on a lock gate arm, if she said yes, she would write hers above his on the same. James and Amy did this, and this is what Alison has translated into the knitted centre piece. A beautiful and tender touch!

Pat collecting her bedpsread

Pat collecting her bedpsread

Pat travelled down to me in south west Northumberland from where she lives near Berwick on Tweed, to collect the bedspread. It then went further on it’s journey to the south, where James and Amy were married last weekend.

James and Amy get married

James and Amy get married

Here is Pat, with the happy couple, James and Amy, and her other son, Sam. Congratulations guys!! I’m loving the dark blue trim on Amy’s dress and the willow pattern Doc Martin boots.

James and Amy with their upcycled wool bedspread

James and Amy with their upcycled wool bedspread

Pat gave James and Amy their bedspread on the morning after the wedding, and I’m delighted to say there were thrilled with it. It was an absolute pleasure to make, and I’m very grateful to Pat for asking me to make it for them.

The wedding cake

The wedding cake

Congratulations to James and Amy! Wishing you both all the very best for your lives together.

Upcycled Patchwork bedspread

Upcycled Patchwork bedspread

Did you know, my patchwork bedspreads can be bought off the shelf from the website, or from Robinson-Gay Gallery on Market St Hexham, or at one of my Events.

Bespoke orders are always a pleasure, and can be made to fit any colourway of your choice. Do get in touch if this is something I can help with.

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Working with Recycled Wool – A Few Questions Answered

Morning! It’s a bit of a damp squib out there, and all intentions of getting out on my bike have gone out the window, so I thought I’d stay in the warmth of my bed, laptop on knee, and write this week’s blog. I get asked lots of questions about working with wool, so I thought I’d try and answer some of them here by going through the processes involved in making clothes, soft furnishings and accessories from recycled wool knitwear.

squares

I posted this photo on my Facebook page this week of wool squares all ready cut out and waiting to be made into a bedspread, and a few questions arose from this which have prompted this week’s blog. They are also a scrummy colour, so hopefully this week’s blog will look pretty as well as be informative!

I’ve already written about how wool jumpers can be sourced in a previous blogpost, ‘Finding Jumpers to Upcycle’. So I’ll start with the process from when I bring the jumpers home.

washing-jumpers

First of all everything is washed. I sort into vague colour piles washing all light jumpers together. It’s not that I’ve ever had a problem with colours running, but you can get wool fibres from one jumper sticking to another. I’ve learnt this the hard way when washing beautiful cream jumpers only to find them covered in black fluff. I wash everything on a 40 degree mixed load with a 1200 spin. Much of today’s woollen knitwear is machine washable and will come out pretty much as it went it, but without the ‘eau de old lady’ pong that can come from charity shops. Other woollies, will felt and shrink and these are just perfect for making bodices for jackets and sweatercoats. As I’ve said before, the bodice needs to be sturdy enough to support the weight of the rest of the garment. This is also the main reason why I don’t make clothes to order, as what size bodices I get to work with very much depend on what I find and how it comes out of the wash. I don’t own a tumble drier, never have done – an unneccessary drain on the planet’s energy resources if you ask me! I either hang up the jumpers outside or dry on racks indoors. Although at times my house ends up looking like Widow Twanky’s laundry!

cutting-wheel-and-mat

When I first starting making things from cut out squares I painstakingly cut all the squares with a pair of scissors using a cardboard square as a template. I hadn’t heard of a cutting wheel, and spent hours and hours cutting each square with my scissors. I even employed the kids and friends of the kids’ to cut out squares for me as it was just taking me too darn long.

Then I discovered a cutting wheel – brilliant! Along with a cutting mat and large ruler with grids marked out cutting became so much easier. Think pizza slicer but for fabric. A word of warning however, these are ridicuously sharp and cutting should always be done away from fingers.

The first task when cutting jumpers is to disect the jumper, cutting away the seams. The beauty of these cutting wheels is that more than one layer of jumper can be cut through at a time, saving precious time. I save the bottom rib bands for making the tops of armwarmers and baby legwarmers.

This brings me nicely back to my cut out squares, and the commonest question I get asked when speaking at meetings.

‘Don’t the squares fray when you’ve cut them out?’

No they don’t is the quick answer. I only use manufactured wool knitwear of medium weight. I don’t use handknits and I don’t use chunky knits. This is mainly because they just don’t work with an overlocker (or serger for those of you across the pond). The cut out pieces just sit there, good as gold, waiting for their turn to be stitched.

workshop-1

When I first started woolly pedlaring, four years ago, I started with a domestic overlocker. You do need an overlocker if you are to sucessfully join knitwear together. A domestic overlocker is a great place to start, but will only cope with fairly lightweight materials. I started by making arwarmers, and soon got the upcycling bug and moved on to making coats and jumpers. It was pretty evident fairly early on that my domestic overlocker was just not up to the job. The smoke coming out of the back after eight hours use a day, and the bunched up stitches where I’d been trying to sew three thicknesses of jumper were a clear indication.

My this point I’d left my teaching job and was seriously considering going self employed. I used my final payment from teaching to set myself up with an industrial overlocker. This is a marvellous piece of kit, and is still going strong. It copes admirably with hours and hours of sewing at a time, and sews through jumpers like soft butter.

Getting the hand of threading can be a right pain, but You Tube has some great tutorials. One top tip I will give you, is to put a different colour thread on each of the four bobbins while you are learning how to thread it. That way you will soon understand what each thread’s job is.

So, now let’s get on with some sewing!

 

Your next decision will be whether to have the seams on the front or on the back. It’s amazing how many men cannot handle the seams on the outside! It’s not exclusively men, but when I sell at fairs, it’s so often the men that comment on my work being ‘the wrong way round’. I do sew with seams on the inside sometimes, but I love the wiggle and added texture that comes from putting seams on the outside.

sewing-squares

This woo bedspread which I’ve just finished for a customer has seams on the back. She wanted a smooth finish. The squares have all been been cut into six inch squares and to make a large double bedspread you will need 360 squares.

I then sew the squares into strips. Each strip has 18 squares, and I made 20 strips.

I then sew up all the strips, and then sew all the way around the perimter of the bedspread. The overlocker will not finish off the end, and you will be left with a ‘chain’ of stitches. Just get a needle and thread and sew this in by hand. The beauty of making a bedspread in this way is that all ends will be stitching in apart from just one at the end, making the hand sewing minimal. As you can imagine, this is a very different matter with something like a handkerchief hem which has dozens of points.

So here we are, one double bedspread. I shall be delivering this to Matilda next week. Let’s hope she likes it!

Untitled-1

 

Of course I make all sorts of other products from recycled wool and not just using squares. I’ll leave you to browse the shop to see what else can be made.

Thanks for reading this week’s blog! I’m sure you have many other questions – ask away! I’m more than happy to help. 🙂

AP68.1

 

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