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Tales Woolly Garret Learn Sew Book

Tales From the Woolly Garret. My Learn to Sew Book

I actually squealed with delight when I unwrapped my parent’s Christmas present to me this year. It was a copy of ‘My Learn to Sew Book’. Back in the gender specific seventies I had been given a ‘My Learn to Sew Book’ and my brother a ‘My Fun with Wood Book’. I wonder, was this how The Woolly Pedlar began?

Tales Woolly Garret Learn Sew book

Tales from the Woolly Garret – My Learn to Sew Book

As a child I was encouraged to make things. I watched Blue Peter and made many of the items Valerie Singleton showed us. I even made my own kids a Tracey Island when Thunderbirds were popular for the second time around in the nineties. When visiting my Nan, I’d be asked in true Jane Austin style, if I had my ‘work’ with me. Not homework, but my embroidery or knitting – something I was positively encouraged to do. Maybe it was to give me something to do while the grown ups were talking.

Growing up in the seventies we made things for something to do. Children’s television ended at 5.30 with The Magic roundabout, when Dad came in from work, and didn’t start again til we got in from school. That included school holidays. We had no computers, ipads, xboxes or Playstations. We played outside, read or made things.

I loved my ‘My Learn to Sew Book’, with it’s projects growing in difficulty. I began with the ‘Shell Shape Needlebook’, which consisted of three shell shaped pieces of felt, joined by overstitching, and added it to me ever growing sewing box. I loved collecting haberdashery, and still have many of these first items in my sewing box today.

My Learn To Sew Book

My Learn To Sew Book

After the shell shaped needlebook, I progressed to a hedgehog pincushion and made a family of finger puppets and a hen egg cosy. I made a stuffed mouse, and a floppy frog. Oh how I loved felt!

My Learn To Sew Book

My Learn To Sew Book

I later progressed to making Baby Billy and Polly Dolly, complete with clothes, though I was a tad disappointed in my Polly Dolly, as she looked nothing like the one in the book. I just couldn’t get the hair right.

My Learn To Sew Book

My Learn To Sew Book

My Nan was a great embroiderer and between her and my ‘My Learn to Sew Book’ I learnt how to do tent stitch, blanket stitch,  chain stitch, French knots, and made a sampler.

These were all sewn by hand, and by making them I learnt sewing techniques that were reinforced at school by sewing binker canvas samplers.

My Learn To Sew Book

My Learn To Sew Book

Patchwork quilting was another sewing skill learnt with the help of ‘My Learn to Sew Book’ and my creative family. My Great Aunt Vera was a quilter, and sold her quilts to America. I remember as a child being in awe of her sewing room, and longed to have one for myself. I made the little dolls bedding set, and then moved on to a full double bedspread, which I’m ashamed to say is one of those unfinished projects I’m sure we all have.

However, what I really wanted to do was make my own clothes, and longed to own a sewing machine, which I eventually did. It was a toy sewing machine, a little red one, and was my pride and joy. I made myself the Dirndl Skirt on p.52. Good grief, what was I thinking? Social suicide surely!! I would have shown you a photo of me in my creation but fortunately I couldn’t find one!

My Learn To Sew Book

My Learn To Sew Book

I’m laughing now a read back through the ‘My Learn to Sew Book’ at some of the promises – apparently if I made the Apron on p54, I would look both ‘smart and sensible’ – something I’ve never aspired to or indeed managed in 54 years!!

I’d lost the original book in the various moves from my childhood home, and am so grateful to my parents for finding me a copy of this wonderful book which brings back so many memories. As I sit up in the woolly garret, surrounded by sewing (not I’m afraid tidily put away in paper of polythene bags as the book suggests), I really do wonder if this was the start of The Woolly Pedlar. I’m so glad I learnt to sew, and I hope generations of children – boys and girls – continue to learn to sew.

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A Steep Learning Curve

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For an old lady of 52, it’s been a steep learning curve over the past two and half years as I’ve learnt how to: set up a Facebook business page; open and use a Twitter account; write a blog, The Bridge Cottage Way using Blogspot; discovered the world of Instagram and Tumblr; set up a profile in LinkdIn and Google; began to get to grips with uploading photos and text to my website.  My latest foray into the world of technology has been to learn how to use Mailchimp.

I have been wanting to send out a newsletter for some time. For two reasons: Firstly, many of my customers are not on Facebook, Twitter or the like, and therefore do not get news of where I’ll be selling my woolly wares next, what I’ve been working on, or any of the woolly upcycling banter that occurs.

Secondly, those of you on Facebook will realise that unless you continually ‘like’ or comment on a person’s posts, then they disappear out of your new feed. News feeds, are of course, by their nature, transitory, and therefore information is moving on all the time. A newsletter may well address this issue by arrving in folks’ inboxes and staying there til deleted.

So, I give you The Woolly Pedlar’s Newsletter – a monthy update of my woolly goings on. – click on the words!  The next one will be in January when I will be revealing the launchdate of the online shop! Exciting times indeed.

 

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