Beryl & Col from Guru Boutique Darlington

In Tales from the Woolly Garret, One Door Closes and Another One Opens.

You know what they say, about doors closing and opening. Well, I had one door slammed firmly shut this month, as I was kicked out of The Sill, in Northumberland National Park. They were furious with me for suggesting their shop gave preference to Chinese made goods over local makers.  Within the very same week I was contacted by Beryl at Guru Boutique in Darlington, begging me to supply her shop with my woolly wares, and in particular, sweatercoats.

I don’t usually put my coats in other shops, as I find they sell really well from the website, but Beryl was quite insistent, so I agreed to meet with her last Sunday. Apparently one of my customers had gone into to the shop wearing a coat I had sold her at Woolfest. Beryl had fallen in love with them, and thought they would be a perfect fit for their shop.

Beryl & Col from Guru Boutique Darlington

Beryl & Col from Guru Boutique Darlington

As soon as I met Beryl, and her partner Col, I recognised a kindred spirit. Not only that, we actually had friends in common amongst the biker fraternity of Darlington. I used to live at the top of Weardale , and our neighbour at the time Dav, turns out to be a really good friend of theirs. Dav is quite a sight to behold, with a ginger beard that is formed into one long dreadlock that reaches the ground, which isn’t that far, as Dav is quite a short guy.

Upcycled sweatercoat by the Woolly Pedlar at Guru Boutique, Darlington

Upcycled sweatercoat by the Woolly Pedlar at Guru Boutique, Darlington

Beryl & Col chose a selection of clothing, which included a coat and jacket, and took it back to the shop. I was amazed to hear that the coat sold in a couple of days!! I was also chuffed to bits to see that they had arranged a photo shoot, and wasted no time at all in posting photos and videos to their Facebook page.

Upcycled patchwork poncho by the Woolly Pedlar at Guru Boutique, Darlington

Upcycled patchwork poncho by the Woolly Pedlar at Guru Boutique, Darlington

Waterfall shawl as modelled by Emily for Guru boutique, Darlington

Waterfall shawl as modelled by Emily for Guru boutique, Darlington

Waterfall shawl as modelled by Emily for Guru boutique, Darlington

Waterfall shawl as modelled by Emily for Guru boutique, Darlington

What awesome support, and what a lovely blossoming relationship. This feels like a far better fit that the corporate world of the National Park. It’s great when the little people can work together and support each other. Beryl tells me Guru Boutique has been trading in Darlington for 47 years. I’m very proud to be part of that story now, and am super glad of the awesome support that these lovely people have given me.

I’m busy making another coat to replace the one that has sold, and will be sending that, along with this super number in red, at the end of the week.

Red sweatercoat by The Woolly Pedlar, destined for Guru Boutique, Darlington

Red sweatercoat by The Woolly Pedlar, destined for Guru Boutique, Darlington

Red sweatercoat by The Woolly Pedlar, destined for Guru Boutique, Darlington

Red sweatercoat by The Woolly Pedlar, destined for Guru Boutique, Darlington

Thanks for reading my blog. Sorry it’s been so long since I have written one!

Just giving the heads up that I have started an End of Summer Sale on this website with all adult ponchos and woolly wraps on the website reduced by 40%.

How much? For an Old Jumper! A Look at Pricing.

They say that pricing is one of the hardest things to get right. Too low and you undersell yourself, don’t make profit, your business won’t grow and you  don’t do other makers a favour as it makes their products look overpriced. Too high and you won’t sell it, or only to a very select few if you are in the right area.

The comment in the title, ‘How much? For an Old Jumper!’ was said to me by an old man at a local Christmas Market last year. I suppose technically it was an old jumper he was referring to, albeit several ‘old’ jumpers, sourced from my local charity shops, washed, then cut up, designed and sewn. I would just like to point out a few other costs that went into getting that jumper to the market.

  • I need a van to carry all my woolly wares to and from markets, that needs taxing, testing, maintaining and fuel buying
  • I had to pay several hundred pounds to be at that market
  • I need to pay myself a wage not only for the hours making that jumper, but for the hours searching for jumpers, washing and designing,
  • I need to pay myself for the time in between – setting up the stall, working on my website, and social media to advertise my work.
  • I need to pay myself a wage for standing at the market
  • I need to pay for my website and its maintenance
  • I need to pay for business cards, leaflets and advertising,
  • I need to pay for packaging.
  • I need to account for my skill, years spent growing my experience and all the mistakes and false starts along the way
  • I need to pay for my materials other than the ‘old jumper’ – thread, scissors, cutting mats, cutting wheels, storage boxes and bags, labels.
  • I need to buy jumpers – only wool jumper mind you, and I buy lots of them!

So, to the man who thought my handmade, upcycled jumper was expensive, but can I just point out, that is isn’t just about the time spent sewing and the cost of a second hand jumper or jumpers, it is about so much more. I value my skills and my business and that is why my prices are as they are. I’m sorry if you thought my work was expensive, of if you couldn’t afford it. On the flip side, these comments are few and far between. The majority of my customers think my work is reasonably priced for are unique and handmade garments. 

One thing that is imperative for dealing with the general public, is a thick skin and a smile!

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